2018 Conference Daily News

May 22

  • Rounding Up: Perfecting ICU RoundsInterprofessional rounding in the ICU is not going away. You may as well adopt it, get good at it, and curate it, according to Jaspal Singh, MD, MHA, MHS. More
  • Speakers Are the Key to TransparencyInternational Conference speakers are required to ensure that ATS audiences are aware of any professional or personal relationships they have with companies that are relevant to their presentation content. More
  • Plenary: Emergency Care in Hostile EnvironmentsTuesday’s plenary session will be a mix of Society business and personal accounts of delivering emergency care during natural disasters. More
  • A Life of Lessons at the Women’s ForumShe has learned many lessons over a lifetime of service. Some are practical: Chilblains are very painful. Others relate to careers: You must learn to market yourself. Still, others are more inspirational: Embrace opportunities and take risks. All of them play a part in what she calls the multicolored quilt of her life. More
  • Polly Parsons: From Poster Presenter to ATS PresidentPolly Parsons, MD, will serve as president of the ATS for the 2018-2019 term. She is the E. L. Amidon Professor of Medicine and chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of Vermont. More
  • Sean Agbor-Enoh, MD, PhD (center) celebrates his BEAR Cage Award with two colleagues BEAR Cage Competition Names a WinnerSean Agbor-Enoh, MD, PhD, took home the fourth annual BEAR Cage prize on Monday afternoon. He pitched a serum-based genomics system to detect early-stage antibody-mediated lung allograft rejection to improve survival. The device uses next-generation genomic screening to detect cell-free donor DNA in graft recipient plasma. More
  • Lung Cancer and the Immune SystemThe relationship between the immune system and cancer is a field under intense investigation. Numerous new therapies that target these interactions are changing the way cancer is treated. The Wednesday session, Manipulating Inflammatory and Epithelial Networks for Prevention and Treatment of Lung Cancer, will address these new therapies and more.  More
  • Exploring Advances in Human Lung BiologyNew approaches to the study of human lung development are generating a fresh look at multiple considerations, from potential therapies to mechanisms that model development and disease.  More
  • Speakers Do a Deep Dive on Seals, Bacteriophage, Pharma and METuesday and Wednesday mark the final two days of the ATS Keynote Series with presentations on the physiology of deep-diving seals, principles of bacteriophage biology, understanding how Pharma scientists think, and becoming an effective medical educator. More
  • The ATS MECOR in Vietnam is one example of the worldwide educational opportunities offered by ATS in low- and middle-income countries. ATS 2017 Annual Report Highlights Global Impact and InitiativesIn 2017, the ATS made important advances in its global initiatives. Here are some of the international highlights from the past year drawn from the ATS 2017 Annual Report. More
  • ATS Debuts Critical Care Board Review Book Fellows preparing for the ABIM critical care certification exam on Nov. 12 now have a new resource: the ATS Review for the Critical Care Boards. More
  • MyATS Launches Collaboration FeatureLast December, ATS launched Phase I of the MyATS web platform, an online portal that allows ATS members to customize their web experience by identifying their “favorite” web pages on the ATS website and saving them in their MyATS dashboard. This month, ATS is launching Phase II, which focuses on expanding members’ abilities to collaborate. More
  • An Exciting Time in Pleural Disease ManagementIn recent years, multicenter randomized clinical trials have addressed the best approach to common clinical dilemmas in pleural disease management, including malignant pleural effusion, pleural infection, tuberculous pleural effusion, and pneumothorax. The Tuesday symposium State-of-the-Art Pleural Disease Management: Clinical Trials Changing Care Practice addresses these advances. More
  • Recognizing CLAD May Improve Transplant Results Chronic lung allograft dysfunction is nothing new. It even has an established acronym, CLAD. But emerging data show a pathophysiology that is more complex than many clinicians or researchers realize. CLAD comes in multiple phenotypes and at least two distinct flavors. More

May 21

  • Garth Garrison, MD Putting Learning Theory Into PracticeEducation is a key skill for every health care provider. Learning how the mind works and how learning happens can make all of us more effective teachers. More
  • Diversity Forum: You Are Your Own CEOBuilding a successful career is all about mindset. Mentors, coaches, and supporters are key contributors, but the single most important factor is you. More
  • Who Really Needs Lung Cancer Screening?Lung cancer screening works. But screening isn’t an unallied benefit for everyone being screened. As ever-larger patient populations undergo screening, it is becoming clear that some patients are better off not being screened. The question is who. More
  • Bioengineering Meets Respiratory MedicineBioengineering is making major inroads on the path from basic science discoveries to practical lung regeneration in patients. Cellular and tissue engineering are still far removed from routine clinical use, but a variety of experimental lung platforms show promise for in vitro lung pathophysiological modeling and regeneration as well as early in vivo work in patients. More
  • Meet the Finalists of BEAR Cage 2018A $5,000 cash prize is on the line for three early career professionals who will “pitch” their innovative research proposals to a panel of translational science experts during the ATS BEAR Cage competition. More
  • Evaluating the Gaps in Patient Care for COPDSuccess in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of COPD is at an all-time high in 2018. Still, gaps remain in the recommendations for certain aspects of care due to contradictory evidence in current medical literature. More
  • Broad Support for Stubbing Out Tobacco UseATS members strongly support the Society’s efforts to advocate against tobacco use and educate the public on the dangers of tobacco. More
  • New at ATS 2018: Educational Consulting OfficeAre you planning on submitting a proposal for programming at the 2019 International Conference but don’t know where to start? More
  • Promoting Pulmonary Rehab ProgramPulmonary rehabilitation is known to improve quality of life for patients with COPD and other lung diseases. The problem? Not enough patients, or their doctors, know about this treatment option. More
  • Tissue-Resident Macrophages and BurnoutThe ATS Keynote Series will continue today as speakers address the effects of macrophage phenotypes and disease, and the personal and professional consequences of burnout. More
  • MECOR Looks To Recruit Faculty, MentorsLoyal to its tagline, “We help the world breath,” the ATS has been working to build research capacity in low- and middle-income countries through its Methods in Epidemiologic, Clinical, and Operations Research (MECOR) program for 25 years. More
  • Explore the Clinical Trial Awareness AreaThe Clinical Trials Awareness area is your on-site resource for finding a clinical connection. If you are looking for opportunities to be an investigator for clinical trials or ongoing trials for your patients, visit with these companies, located in Lobby E outside the Exhibit Hall. More
  • Should There Be a Global Approach to Sleep Medicine?Although the global burden of sleep disorders remains unknown, it is estimated that obstructive sleep apnea affects nearly 1 billion people worldwide—and that’s a conservative number, according to Atul Malhotra, MD, of the University of California at San Diego. More
  • Recognition Award Winners to Present ResearchFour outstanding scientists have been selected to receive the Recognition Award for Scientific Accomplishments. The awards recognize scientific contributions in basic or clinical research that enhance the understanding, prevention, and treatment of respiratory disease or critical illness. Awardees will each make a 25-minute presentation on their research. More
  • Fluid Administration in SepsisAdministration of intravenous fluid is one of the key therapies in the ICU for treating one of our most common and lethal diseases—sepsis. There’s been a large reduction in sepsis mortality, which is partially attributable to early and aggressive fluid administration. However, several recent investigations have raised questions about the appropriateness of current fluid practice. More
  • ATS Foundation Recognizes 2017 DonorsThe ATS Foundation is pleased to recognize our generous donors who made gifts between Jan. 1, 2017, and Dec. 31, 2017. More
  • Buist to Share Life Lessons During Women’s ForumWhat I do today is very important because I am exchanging a day of my life for it.” This motto is one that A. Sonia Buist, MD, repeats daily. She is this year’s featured speaker at the ATS Women’s Forum, an annual event that recognizes the achievements and supports the advancement of women in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine and research. More
  • Bloggers Bring More Session Coverage to ATSFear of missing out (FOMO) can be a real thing at ATS 2018, where you can choose from 500 educational sessions. To minimize that FOMO, you can follow the blogs of four physicians who will bring you daily recaps of the sessions they are attending as they share their experiences online. Look for their blogs on the ATS Facebook page. Here is a quick look at the doctors who’ll be making sure you don’t miss a thing. More

May 20

  • Darrell G. Kirch, MD: “We do a much better job of rescuing people than we do in keeping them well.” Clinicians Can Treat Health Care CrisisDarrell G. Kirch, MD, president and CEO of the Association of American Medical Colleges, delivered the keynote address during the opening session on Saturday. He laid out six key challenges facing health care around the world. Clinicians are best equipped to meet all six. More
  • James F. Donohue, MD, (left) accepts the Breathing for Life Award from ATS Foundation Chair Dean Schraufnagel. ATS Foundation Honors Donohue for Commitment to ResearchJames F. Donohue, MD, has spent a lifetime putting patients first. His commitment to them, in combination with his dedication to finding better treatment options for them, has earned him the highest honor bestowed by the ATS Foundation. On Saturday, the Foundation presented Dr. Donohue with the Breathing for Life Award at its 10th Annual Research Program Benefit at the Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego. More
  • Respiratory Innovation Summit Fills Development GapInnovation fosters innovation. That simple connection inspired the first Respiratory Innovation Summit, which launched Saturday during the ATS 2018 International Conference. And ATS President Marc Moss, MD, served as the premiere speaker. More
  • ATS Lauds 3 Scientists at Opening CeremonyATS presented its annual Respiratory Health Awards during the opening ceremony on Saturday. George Thurston, MD, received the Public Service Award; Eric D. Bateman, MB, ChB, received the World Lung Health Award; and Yohannes T. Ghebre, PhD, received the Jo Rae Wright Award for Outstanding Science. More
  • Jeffrey A. Whitsett, MD Q&A: Trudeau Medalist’s Work Helps Save NewbornsJeffrey A. Whitsett, MD, recipient of this year’s Edward Livingston Trudeau Medal, spoke with the ATS Daily Bulletin about his research on surfactant production and function in preterm infants, the work he’s doing now, his clinical contributions, and more. More
  • New Therapies Target MitochondriaThere’s a new bad kid on the block driving lung disease, including pulmonary hypertension and inflammatory diseases: dysfunctional mitochondria. Mitochondrial dysfunction as a driver of oxidative injury is not new, but technological advances are helping researchers and clinicians understand just how intimately involved mitochondria can be in disease pathophysiology—and to identify new therapies that target mitochondria. More
  • A man lighting a cigarette Reducing Environmental Exposures in the DisadvantagedA staggering percentage of the world’s population is exposed to unsafe air. Unfortunately, the burden of this generally falls hardest on the poorest communities, which suffer a higher prevalence of lung disease and associated health effects.   More
  • Keynote Series: Research and Slow MedicineThe ATS Keynote Series highlights major advances, recent discoveries, significant accomplishments, transformative findings, and important best practices in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. These state-of-the-art lectures are presented in two sessions at 8:15-9 a.m. each morning during the conference, when no other programming is scheduled. More
  • PAR Helps Patients Live WellEveryone wants to live their best life. But for those who have a disease or condition that affects their lungs, that can be difficult to do. More
  • Early Career Professionals Get AheadWhile many ATS 2018 attendees have been gearing up for the conference, some have already been hard at work. They came early to participate in programs for early career professionals— the Student Scholars Program, the Resident Boot Camp, and the ATS Fellows Track Symposium. More
  • Welcome!Welcome to ATS 2018, the intellectual crossroads of pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine! More
  • A group of people connecting at a networking event Connect With Colleagues at Networking EventsExpanding your knowledge and network are primary objectives of the ATS 2018 International Conference, where you will find world-class educational programming as well as numerous opportunities for networking. More
  • A diverse group of people holding hands Bibbins-Domingo to Discuss Communities at RiskThe annual ATS Diversity Forum’s featured speaker is Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, MD, PhD, MAS, who will address career and diversity issues followed by a question-and-answer period. More
  • Earn MOC Points and CME CreditsATS 2018 attendees are able to earn up to 44.5 American Board of Internal Medicine MOC Medical Knowledge points and 10 American Board of Pediatrics Part 2 MOC Self-Assessment points. More
  • Tuberculosis Still Threatens Public Health WorldwideFor decades, health officials have set their sites on eradicating tuberculosis. Although the number of active TB cases has decreased in the United States and other developed countries, it remains widespread around the world. In fact, TB has regained the inglorious distinction of being the infectious disease that kills more people than any other, according to Kevin Fennelly, MD, MPH, chair of the ATS Assembly on Pulmonary Infections and TB. More
  • From Spanish Flu to EbolaViruses evolve principally to survive and propagate. Killing the host is not part of that survival plan. When viruses go rogue, bad things happen. In talking about rogue viruses, Joshua Lederberg, the microbial geneticist and Nobel Laureate, said, “The single biggest threat to man’s continued dominance on the planet is the virus.” More
  • New ATS Executive DirectorATS has a new executive director. Karen Collishaw, MPP, a highly experienced medical association leader, joined the ATS at the end of April after a national search. She succeeds Stephen C. Crane, PhD, MPH, who has served as ATS executive director since 2007 and is retiring. More
  • Debunking Medical MythsExciting advances in iPS cell differentiation and ex vivo lung tissue bioengineering are gaining new attention as potential therapies for lung disease and transplantation. More
  • Proteins Could be Key to Rare Lung DisordersPediatric rare lung diseases, including disorders such as childhood interstitial and diffuse lung diseases primary ciliary dyskinesia, and lung involvement in systemic juvenile inflammatory arthritis, are associated with high morbidity and are often life-threatening. These disorders are poorly understood, under-recognized, and have limited evidence-based therapeutic options. More
  • Sunday Awards Session Honors Four RecipientsFour renowned physicians and researchers will be honored during Sunday’s Awards Session, featuring the Amberson Lecture and the presentation of the Trudeau Medal and two Distinguished Achievement Awards. More
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